Alpha Universe Story Detail
Superior Performance of the Sony 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS Super-Telephoto Zoom Lens
by Mobile01

Here comes the Sony 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS. When Sony released the 400mm F2.8 GM last year, I said “the question is not whether Sony will launch a telephoto lens but when.” That is, after the release of the 400mm F2.8 lens, Sony was bound to launch a 600mm F4 lens. When the 600mm F4 GM lens was launched last month, Sony also announced this gorgeous 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS lens.

At first glance, the specifications of the Sony 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS are not that impressive. By comparison, the Tamron or Sigma 150-600mm lenses priced below NTD 30,000 have a starting aperture of F5, while the starting aperture of the Sony 200-600mm G lens is F5.6. The Nikon 200-500mm E features a constant aperture of F5.6. At first glance, the Sony 200-600mm lens is not superior to its competitors in terms of specifications. However, simple specifications do not mean much when it comes to the quality of a lens. Professional reviewers have their place. In short, the Sony 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS, featuring fast-focusing, outstanding image quality, and high cost performance, is suitable for professional photographers.

What’s most impressive about this lens? The internal zoom mechanism. Along with the fact that it is the first super-telephoto zoom lens designed for mirrorless cameras.

In the past, such small-aperture super-telephoto zoom lenses usually featured external zoom lenses, such as:

Sony 100-400mm F4.5-5.6 GM
Nikon 200-500mm F5.6 E
Tamron 150-600mm F5-6.3
Sigma 150-600mm F5-6.3 Contemporary/Sport

Those are all external zoom lenses, which is reasonable if you think about it. An external zoom design helps reduce the size and weight of a super-telephoto lens, making it more attractive to consumers. I once asked a senior executive of Sony why their 100-400mm GM lens features an external zoom, while the 200-600mm G lens features an internal zoom. He said that the 100-400mm GM lens utilizes an external zoom design in order to achieve a minimum focus distance of 1 m and minimize lens size.

But after the launch of the 100-400mm GM, Sony received a lot of feedback from consumers who really wanted a super-telephoto lens with an internal zoom. Therefore, Sony implemented this feature on the 200-600mm G. What are the benefits of an internal zoom? It looks better and helps prevent dust from being sucked in during zooming.

Another advantage of an internal zoom is that the main structure of the lens remains unchanged. Thus, regardless of whether you zoom towards the wide-angle or the telephoto end, the center of gravity of the lens is basically the same, which means that the camera’s stability is not affected during zooming.

Four-sided view of the lens—click to view more details.

Since the 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G is an internal zoom lens, its size and weight are relatively large: diameter: 11.2 cm, length: 31.8 cm, weight: 2,115 g. Users should be aware of the weight of a super-telephoto lens. Usually, lenses like this weigh around 2 kg.

The 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G has 24 elements in 17 groups, including five ED (Extra-low Dispersion) glass elements (green) and one aspherical element (purple). Minimum focus distance: 2.4 m; maximum magnification: 0.2x.

How is the F5.6-6.3’s range distributed? Basically, the f-number is F6.3 when the focal length exceeds 300 mm. How about within the F5.6-6.3 range? The difference between F5.6 and F6.3 is 1/3 stops down only. The lens has two maximum apertures only: F5.6 and F6.3.

The lens body is made of metal, but unlike the magnesium alloy body of the 400mm GM or 600mm GM lens. The lens and each one of its joints has a dust- and moisture-resistant design.

The side function keys on Sony’s super-telephoto lenses are arranged in the same order. The top of the camera has buttons for focus controls; the bottom of the camera is where SteadyShot is set. The arrangement of this lens is the same as that of the 100-400mm GM and 70-200mm GM. The 400mm GM and 600mm GM lenses are of a higher class. They are additionally equipped with a full-time DMF key, a function preset key in the middle, and a BEEP key in the lower-most part. The arrangement of keys is logical. This allows photographers to switch from one Sony lens to another with relative ease.

In addition, the SteadyShot function of the 200-600mm G lens includes three modes of vibration compensation. Mode 1 compensates for normal camera shake; Mode 2 compensates for camera shake when panning moving subjects; Mode 3 compensates for camera shake to minimize framing disturbances. Different modes are used for different subjects or scenes. Mode 3 may be a better choice for taking photographs of fast subjects with irregular movement, such as athletes or wild animals.

By the way, the tripod is detachable.

The diameter of the front-end filter is 95 mm. Unlike the G Master’s super-telephoto lens series, this lens does not come equipped with a drop-in filter. Therefore, if you want to add a protective or polarizing filter, you will have to purchase a protective or polarizing filter separately.

The lens is equipped with 11 circular aperture blades. The more blades there are, the more rounded bokeh you can achieve. At present, Sony’s new lenses are equipped with at least 9 circular aperture blades.

On this lens, there are 3 focus-hold buttons. If necessary, you can set these buttons on the lens. Enter the menu, and you will find 23 “pages” of content that can be assigned.

How big is this lens? Let’s compare it with the other two lenses:

The left lens is a 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G; the middle lens is a 24-105mm F4G; the right lens is a Tamron 70-200mm F2.8 G2. They are almost the length of a 70-200mm F2.8 GM lens. Can you imagine how large the Sony 200-600mm G lens is?

Features and functions of the lens

From 200 mm to 1800 mm

The Sony lens has an equivalent focal length of 200-600 mm, but it can produce images at up to 1800 mm—a huge range.

200-600 mm is the focal length of the lens itself. If you add a 1.4x teleconverter, the total focal length will be increased to 840 mm; if you add a 2x teleconverter, the total focal length will be 1200 mm—a real, optical value. If you perform further digital cropping with an APS-C sensor, the total focal length can be increased to an incredible 1800 mm, but the pixel count will be reduced to 18 megapixels.

First, let me show you a photo. This photo was taken with my iPhone 8, at an equivalent effective focal length of about 28 mm.

The subject is the thing in the middle... well, I mean... a ship. Anyway, it is the black dot in the center of the image. Even if you click to zoom in on the image, the subject still looks like a black dot.

Let’s compare images taken at a focal length of 200 mm to 1800 mm:

Let me give you more examples. Have you ever watched close-up shots of the rising or setting sun shown on the Discovery Channel? These close-up shots were taken at the following focal lengths:

I used to believe that a lens with a focal length of 400 or 600 mm would be enough to take these shots. In fact, even 1800 mm is not enough to fill the entire picture with the sun.

Actually, when it comes to sunrises, picture quality is not the most important factor. The distance through the air is substantial, so it is difficult to take sharp pictures of the sun. Blurriness at the edges of the sun is completely normal.

Sharpness

Some editors feel that it is difficult to compare the sharpness of different lenses. To keep the center and corners on the same “infinity” plane, you have to find a distant subject to photograph. This is what makes comparisons difficult. For ordinary lenses, 50~100 m is infinity. But for this super-telephoto lens, if the subject is 50 m away, and I set the focal length to 600 mm, the subject would become too big and lack detail. Otherwise, the lens would allow you to clearly see the furniture in other people’s homes.

To measure lens sharpness, I selected a subject at least 500 m away, in order to satisfy the range of 200-600 mm and achieve picture details that can withstand my cropping. Unfortunately, the subject was too far away and the hot weather caused thermal convection which blurred the pictures—entire areas became blurred. On cloudy days, there is a risk of camera shake because of a low shutter speed; on summer days, there is a risk of image blur due to high humidity.

So basically, the above comments are for your reference.

To evaluate lens sharpness, I’ve taken the following pictures at 200 mm, 400 mm, and 600 mm respectively, and then compared the image quality of the center and corners, from the maximum aperture to F32. In fact, the minimum aperture of the lens is F36, but I didn’t think it was necessary to go that far because 1/3 stops down is almost unusable for testing purposes. Thus, the minimum aperture was discarded. At 860 mm and 1200 mm, I will compare only the quality of images at the maximum aperture.

200 mm
400 mm
600 mm

If you ask me whether the aperture of the 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 is too small, I think it is acceptable, and F6.3 works well enough in sunny conditions. But if you add a teleconverter, things will be different. If a 1.4x teleconverter is added, the aperture is reduced by one step; if a 2x teleconverter is added, the aperture is reduced by two steps. In other words, 600mm F6.3 becomes 840mm F9 if a 1.4x teleconverter is used or 1200mm F13 if a 2x teleconverter is used. The F13 aperture is not fun at all, right?

I think this is one of the reasons why the 400mm F2.8 and 600mm F4 are expensive. After a 1.4x or 2x teleconverter is added, 600mm becomes 840mm F5.6 or 1200mm F8, respectively. There is a big difference between F8 and F13.

Let’s compare the difference between 840 mm and 1200 mm:

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS with 1.4x Teleconverter | 840 mm | 1/100 sec | F9 | ISO 100

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS with 2x Teleconverter | 1200 mm | 1/60 sec | F13 | ISO 100

Will using a teleconverter reduce the sharpness? Definitely. From my experience, there’s not too much of a reduction in sharpness. However, I think the subject was too far away. The effects of airflow and thermal convection should be taken into account. Please have a look at other sample shots at the end of this post, which are closer to the standard in my opinion.

Focusing speed

I already have a clear idea of what the focusing speed will be on the day when the 600mm F4 GM and the 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G launch. I’m almost willing to guarantee that the focus motor of the 600mm F4 G is an XD (extreme dynamic) linear focus motor, like the one used in the 400mm F2.8 GM and the 135mm F1.8 GM. This focus motor is very fast and definitely works well. The 200-600mm lens must be equipped with a direct drive supersonic wave motor (DDSSM)—the one used in the 70-200mm GM.

The first time I tried out this lens, I was accompanied by a photographer who was working with Sony to photograph a Taiwan Football Premier League match (Taichung FUTURO vs. Taiwan Steel). The camera I used was an Alpha 9. So how is its focusing performance? First, please watch the following video:

This video was taken with my cell phone connected to a viewfinder. It’s really difficult to keep track of the players. But I think this video is useful for comparison’s sake.

The focusing speed of the 200-600mm G lens is extremely fast, just like a GM lens. It’s hard to describe how fast it is. From my experience, the focusing speed of the 200-600mm G is similar to that of the 70-200mm F2.8 GM. Although this is a G lens instead of a G Master, I can assure you that its focusing speed is definitely at the same level as a high-end lens. It is not a cheap lens at all, even though it is called a G lens.

To be honest, I think the focusing speed of the two lenses is similar, but the “starting speed of focusing” of the 600GM is pretty scary. Um... how can I describe it? Here’s a useful analogy: say you have two cars which can both reach a maximum speed of 100 km/h, but one is a pure sports car, and the other is a supercar. When you push the gas pedal of the supercar, you can clearly feel the difference. You will be firmly planted against your the back of your seat. The 600mm GM is like the supercar and its focusing speed is scary, while the focusing speed of the 200-600mm G is smooth, quiet, and fast. Both are fast, but the 600mm GM is even faster.

The following six GIF images were selected from more than 5,000 consecutive photos taken on that day. Each image shows a subject making a series of movements. I think these images demonstrate the focusing performance of the lens.




I even used the zoom function when taking this set of pictures. Zooming may affect the focusing. I think this phenomenon is found in all zoom lenses, except cinematography lenses. As shown in the above image, the image was slightly blurred while zooming. From my experience, if the zoom ring is turned more intensely, the possibility of falling out of focus will increase; but if you continue using the AF-C mode, the camera will be in focus immediately and the picture is clear again. Falling out of focus occurs only during zooming.



In this set of pictures, when the subject was closest to the camera, he was approaching the critical point of the minimum focus distance of the 200-600mm G lens. Within about five meters, the player was already standing on the sidelines. But every picture is in focus.


Ouch...

There is some blur in this set of photos, not because of poor focusing, but because the camera panned over the players, and the players were close to the camera. Even if my shutter speed was more than one-thousandth of a second, the camera still could not have captured the subjects clearly. Why? The sky was overcast. I dared not use a faster shutter speed, for fear of underexposure. With an aperture of F5.6-6.3, the lens allows me to use a shutter speed of one-thousandth of a second to achieve a sensitivity of ISO 6400+ under the overcast sky. For sports photography, I think lenses with a larger aperture are preferred. But they’re much more expensive.

Purple fringe

This time, I did not deliberately test for purple fringing, but here is an example from an actual shoot:

Alpha 7R III | 374 mm | 1/320 sec | F6.3 | ISO 1000

During my last excursion, an expert told me about a few Taiwanese blue magpie chicks who were preparing to leave their nest in a zoo in the Ankeng region. I packed up my equipment and rushed to the indicated location. The photographers there were all very friendly. They explained the situation to me before I even said a word: one chick had just left the nest, which still contained three other chicks, and their mother was still nearby. The chick that had left hadn’t gone too far yet and was waiting to be fed (sounded like me when I was out of a job).

If you were a bird, where would you build your nest? I don’t know if wind direction or geomagnetism matters when it comes to building a nest, but I would definitely build my nest in a cool or secluded place. The forested environment in which birds are photographed are usually not very well-lit and the nests are usually not exposed to the sun, lest the chicks be harmed by sunlight. In addition, the maximum aperture of the 600mm lens is F6.3. Even if the weather was good that day, pictures were shot at a shutter speed of 1/320 s and a sensitivity of ISO 1000. In fact, the shutter speed of 1/320 s is barely satisfactory. Since birds are not apt to just stop and let you take pictures of them, many photos have motion blur.

Back to the problem of purple fringing. Please note the light spots between the leaves in the background. I didn’t see any purple fringing or green fringing there. I used lens compensation throughout the entire photo session.

Flare and ghosting

Refraction and reflection between lenses causes lens flare and ghosting. In the past, we usually took pictures of leaves in the sun. That’s because lens flare and ghosting are most noticeable under strong light; the leaves can also provide sufficient dark areas (contrast) that emphasize the flare and ghosting. In the late afternoon, when we were shooting a soccer game, we found a suitable scene for testing:

Alpha 9 | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 200 mm | 1/500 sec | F5.6 | ISO 100

Alpha 9 | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 200 mm | 1/500 sec | F5.6 | ISO 640

“Lens flare” is a phenomenon wherein light is scattered in a lens system, often in response to a bright light. For example, the building on the right does not glow at all, but was brightened by the sun. That is an example of lens flare. Ghosting is when spots of light that were not in the scene appear in the image. For example, on the butt of the player, there was a spot of light that did not exist in reality. To mitigate these two phenomena, Sony uses an AR coating to eliminate reflections between elements. The content of the coating, how the coating is applied, and which element is provided with the coating are trade secrets of manufacturers.

Since the aperture is not too large, I think light fall-off of the lens is not as obvious at the maximum aperture of 200 mm or 600 mm.

Impressions and advice

We have tried this type of super-telephoto zoom lens. I am referring to a small-aperture lens such as the Canon 200-400mm F4, with a built-in teleconverter priced over NTD 400,000 which is out of the scope of our discussion. These lenses are often reasonably priced and can even be described as cheap, but their focusing speed and picture quality are barely acceptable. Lens adaptation is good, but the focusing speed of such lenses on a DSLR camera is pedestrian at best. You can’t expect too much after lens adaptation, right? So, in the past, I believed that such 150-600mm lenses are used only for “fun” and allow people who have never used a super-telephoto lens to experience super-telephoto shooting at a low price. Their focusing speed is enough to shoot still subjects or something that does not move swiftly. If you use such a lens to shoot sports games or subjects like players on the move, you have to be mentally prepared for a high failure rate.

However, Sony does not think so. It has developed 33 full-frame lenses and a variety of focus motor technologies, from the previous stepper motors, linear motors, and direct-drive focus motors to the highest level of extreme dynamic linear-focus motors. Sony can achieve ultra-low friction, high torque, fast focusing speed, and high accuracy at the same time. There is really no reason for consumers to use substandard products. So even if it is a G lens, it should have the focusing ability of a GM lens. People who use super-telephoto lenses would be disappointed if the focusing speed of the lens was unsatisfactory.

The focusing ability of this lens has never disappointed me. It performs every bit as well as a high-end lens would.

An outstanding telephoto lens, with a reasonable price and high cost-performance ratio.

The manufacturer’s suggested retail price for the 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G: NTD 57,980. Is it expensive? Let me tell you why the price is reasonable. Firstly, it is the first and only native Sony super-telephoto zoom lens. Among all the lenses in its class, only the 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G can fully support the extreme focusing ability of the Sony Alpha 9 and continuous shooting of 20 images per second. The lens also supports other outstanding cameras like Alpha 7R III, Alpha 7 III, and Alpha 6400. In the past, you may have preferred the combination of a Sony camera with a Tamron, Sigma, or Nikon lens, but the resulting focusing speed is inferior to that of a native Sony lens.

Secondly, the focusing speed of the 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G is comparable to that of top-grade lenses. I dare not say that it’s focusing speed can beat top lenses like 400mm GM or 600mm GM, which are priced above NTD 350,000, but the speed of the 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G is very high, similar to that of the 70-200mm GM.

Thirdly, the 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G is the only super-telephoto small-aperture lens that features internal zoom. The internal zoom design looks not only better, but also helps prevent dust from being sucked in. It’s quite costly to dismantle a telephoto lens and clean out the dust.

Finally, although the aperture of the 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G is small, the quality of the images taken with this super-telephoto zoom lens at max aperture is not compromised. We paired the lens with a Sony Alpha 7R III camera featuring 42.4 MP and tested picture quality at a crop factor of 1:1. The resulting picture quality was still excellent. If you pair the lens with a Sony Alpha 9 camera with 24.0 MP, the resulting images will look very sharp.

In view of its specifications, advantages, and price, this Sony lens really is an outstanding choice. Priced below NTD 60,000, the lens not only offers a great range of focal length and outstanding picture quality, but also a strong focusing ability to fully support the new-generation Sony cameras. For Sony users, especially those who like to shoot birds, animals, sports, and more, if you have a tight budget of less than NTD 300,000 and believe that the 100-400mm GM does not have enough focal length range, I would recommend this 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 lens.

If possible, please pair the lens with a 1.4x or 2x teleconverter and perform cropping in APS-C mode. This combination will bring the focal length up to 1800 mm—it will make a world of difference.

Sample images

All sample images provided herein are original JPEG pictures. Most are in standard picture style, while some are Vivid. No postproduction was done to any of these pictures on a computer. All pictures of sports games were shot with a Sony Alpha 9 and the remaining pictures were taken with a Sony Alpha 7R III. Images at 1200 mm or below were taken with the 200-600mm G lens paired with a 2x teleconverter. Images at 1800 mm were achieved by pairing the lens with the teleconverter and performing cropping in APS-C mode; the pixel count of resulting images is 18 megapixels.

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 600 mm | 1/200 sec | F6.3 | ISO 500

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 600 mm | 1/200 sec | F18 | ISO 100

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 900 mm | 1/200 sec | F10 | ISO 100

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 1200 mm | 1/320 sec | F13 | ISO 1250

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 1200 mm | 1/640 sec | F13 | ISO 5000

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 1200 mm | 1/200 sec | F13 | ISO 2500

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 1200 mm | 1/200 sec | F13 | ISO 3200

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 1200 mm | 1/200 sec | F13 | ISO 4000

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 400 mm | 1/13 sec | F14 | ISO 100

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 758 mm | 1/200 sec | F13 | ISO 6400

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 1200 mm | 1/160 sec | F13 | ISO 10000

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 1000 mm | 1/160 sec | F13 | ISO 10000

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 1200 mm | 1/250 sec | F13 | ISO 500

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 1800 mm | 1/125 sec | F13 | ISO 100

Alpha 7R III | 1800mm | ISO 100 | F/13.0 | 1/125 sec

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 1200 mm | 1/125 sec | F13 | ISO 250

Alpha 7R III | 1200mm | ISO 6400 | F/13.0 | 1/160 sec

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 1200 mm | 1/160 sec | F13 | ISO 250

Is the focusing speed suitable for shooting people who are moving quickly? Please have a look at this picture:

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 594 mm | 1/1250 sec | F6 | ISO 400

What I could not imagine in the past has become reality. You can use this super-telephoto lens to keep track of a dragonfly. I assure you that those dragonflies were not hovering in the air but flying around. The picture was shot with the lens paired with the Alpha 7R III. It’s really not difficult at all. That’s awesome.

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 594 mm | 1/1250 sec | F6.3 | ISO 500

At this particular location, I was snapping away without purpose or thought, but the results were really surprising.

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 359 mm | 1/1250 sec | F6.3 | ISO 1000

Let me give you more sample images; otherwise, you would think that I am exaggerating by using only one successful picture obtained after a whole day’s effort at the scene. In fact, my computer has more pictures with the subject in focus. What I’m saying is that you don’t need to use a high-end camera, such as a Sony Alpha 9. Pictures of this quality can be produced by pairing the lens with the right camera body. It’s really not difficult at all.

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 200 mm | 1/400 sec | F5.6 | ISO 100

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 600 mm | 1/800 sec | F6.3 | ISO 100

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 600 mm | 1/250 sec | F6.3 | ISO 800

Minimum focus distance: 2.4 m; magnification ratio: 0.2x.

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 600 mm | 1/250 sec | F6.3 | ISO 500

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 433 mm | 1/250 sec | F6.3 | ISO 4000

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 411 mm | 1/160 sec | F6.3 | ISO 3200

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 600 mm | 1/320 sec | F6.3 | ISO 10000

There was insufficient light in the shade of the forest, so I needed to increase the shutter speed slightly. In fact at 1/320 s, it did not reach 1/600 s—a safe shutter speed. But my ISO had exceeded 10,000. The performance was outstanding thanks to the excellent noise suppression and SteadyShot vibration compensation features of the Sony Alpha 7R III.

Alpha 7R III | 600mm | ISO 6400 | F/6.3 | 1/320 sec

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 600 mm | 1/320 sec | F6.3 | ISO 6400

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 385 mm | 1/640 sec | F6.3 | ISO 3200

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 600 mm | 1/640 sec | F7.1 | ISO 16000

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 315 mm | 1/640 sec | F6.3 | ISO 6400

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 900 mm | 1/200 sec | F6.3 | ISO 2000

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 900 mm | 1/200 sec | F6.3 | ISO 8000

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 374 mm | 1/320 sec | F6.3 | ISO 1000

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 820 mm | 1/250 sec | F6.3 | ISO 10000

I was trying very hard to take pictures at a low shutter speed, but the F6.3 aperture is more challenging in a low light environment and I often exceeded ISO 10000.

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 820 mm | 1/400 sec | F6.3 | ISO 12800

The bird was using its long beak to catch a bug in a trunk.

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 900 mm | 1/400 sec | F6.3 | ISO 2500

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 600 mm | 1/50 sec | F6.3 | ISO 1000

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 600 mm | 1/250 sec | F6.3 | ISO 1250

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 600 mm | 1/500 sec | F6.3 | ISO 2500

Alpha 7R III | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 306 mm | 1/1600 sec | F6.3 | ISO 500

I waited for about two hours to take this picture. When the plane showed up, I needed to capture the plane in less than a second. That was really a difficult shot. To get this kind of picture, however, a super-telephoto lens is not necessary. The above picture was taken at only 306 mm. If you use a flight tracker APP, you won’t have to wait that long.

What? The photo is blurry? Yes, but the blur was not caused by the lens or the camera, but due to the hot weather and obvious heat convection on the ground. I thought the image was out of focus. If you take a close look at the image, not a single part of it is sharp, which proves that the image is not out of focus. Therefore, when the weather is too hot, we’d better stay in an air-conditioned space, otherwise pictures taken outdoors would be blurry.

Alpha 9 | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 478 mm | 1/1600 sec | F6.3 | ISO 1250

Alpha 9 | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 200 mm | 1/500 sec | F5.6 | ISO 640

Alpha 9 | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 474 mm | 1/640 sec | F6.3 | ISO 2000

Alpha 9 | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 257 mm | 1/125 sec | F5.6 | ISO 400

Alpha 9 | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 600 mm | 1/800 sec | F6.3 | ISO 1000

Alpha 9 | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 202 mm | 1/2000 sec | F5.6 | ISO 2500

Alpha 9 | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 200 mm | 1/2000 sec | F5.6 | ISO 2000

This picture was taken unexpectedly. The focus was not on the goalkeeper, but slightly behind him on a player who was outside the frame. After this image is sharpened slightly, it is still usable. I think it’s quite compelling.

Alpha 9 | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 200 mm | 1/1600 sec | F5.6 | ISO 2000

Alpha 9 | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 433 mm | 1/1600 sec | F6.3 | ISO 2000

Alpha 9 | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 415 mm | 1/1600 sec | F6.3 | ISO 2500

Alpha 9 | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 200 mm | 1/1600 sec | F5.6 | ISO 2000

Alpha 9 | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 200 mm | 1/1600 sec | F5.6 | ISO 160

Alpha 9 | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 600 mm | 1/1600 sec | F6.3 | ISO 2000

Alpha 9 | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 200 mm | 1/1600 sec | F5.6 | ISO 1000

Finally, I want to share one of my favorite pictures taken during this shooting test. Can you tell whether the following is the sun or the moon?

Alpha 9 | FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS | 200 mm | 1/125 sec | F13 | ISO 100

It’s the sun. It’s very easy to guess, because it’s too early for a full moon and the moon wouldn’t be that bright. The wonderful colors of this picture were not the result of any complicated setting. I simply adjusted the white balance to see how yellow it could be. After the color temperature exceeded 9900K, the color temperature of the Alpha 7R III jumped back to 2500K. This picture is the result of an accidental setting. At first glance, it looks odd. But if you take a closer look at the picture, you’ll find it unique and interesting. I especially like the clouds near the sun. It looks like a hot, glowing ball, while the reflection of the blue ocean below gives me a sense of peace.

Special thanks to:

Chinese Taipei Football Association
Anonymous photographers in the soccer field
Sheng Pu Huang

This article was originally published on https://www.mobile01.com/